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Chris "Curly" Anderson / Chuck "Chugger" Boczek / Marc "Dutch" Reinerth
Matt "Maverick" Bartolone / Jeff "Cartwright" Tomsha / Sam "Colt" Bartolone
Shaun "Dublin" Leahey / Joe "Gramps" Toth / Jim "Buck’ McVicar
Ray "Thumper" Pachuta / Mike "Whitey" White / Dan "Scooter" Milz
Garth "Busch" Lewis / Mike "Diego" Pachuta / Tony "Tiger" Jagodzinski
Karl "Judge" Krueger

Club History - Base Ball In the Era Depicted

 

According to Judge William Horton, writing for the Mount Clemens Daily Leader in 1928, Mount Clemens had an amateur baseball club as early as 1865, when some returning Civil War veterans formed a team called the Regulars. The current Regulars enact the early pre-professional game, in the waning years of the Gentlemen's Club era; played solely for recreation and exercise under the highest standards of sportsmanship - base ball as it was meant to be played.

 

The Original Regular Base Ball Club of Mount Clemens was formed in the name of Civil War "Regular" (vs. volunteer) soldiers in the 1860's. The current Regulars enact the early pre-professional game, in the waning years of the Gentlemen's Club era; played soley for recreation and exercise under the highest standards of sportsmanship - base ball as it was meant to be played.

 

Base ball in 1860 was experiencing explosive growth with men's clubs of firemen, bankers, merchants, etc, forming through the Northeast, particularly still in the New York area with over 50 clubs. In 1860 there were a dozen clubs here in the far "Northwest," as Michigan was known. The number dropped to 4 during the Civil War and exploded to 240 in 1867. In the 1860's it was still forbidden by association rules for base ball players to be paid, yet in the Northeast, ball fields were starting to be enclosed and admission was being charged. The best ball players were being paidunder the table and many clubs ignored the existing gentleman's standard. Clubs were becoming less sporting with players disputing and attempting to trick umpires and pitchers trying to intimidate batsmen by pitching 'at' them instead of 'for' them. Some gentlemen's clubs chose not to accept challenges from some "win at all cost" clubs. In the 1870's professional base ball was well established.

 

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